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Library Instruction: Home

What can Library Instruction do for my Students?

Librarians at BCC provide comprehensive, understandable, and practical instruction on every aspect of the research process. Students will learn how to evaluate websites, choose relevant books and ebooks, find academic or scholarly articles, and write citations.

Library Instruction Options

Research with an instruction librarian always revolves around your assigned research project or paper. We will recommend databases, teach website evaluation, and discuss how different source types (books, websites, journal articles, etc.) might best meet students' research needs.

We encourage you to choose the model that best fits your information literacy needs.  We would be happy to meet with you to discuss the possibilities in more depth.

One Shot Library Instruction

This traditional method of instruction involves a librarian teaching your class for one session, including all relevant research instruction for the assignment.

Multiple Sessions

This method of instruction allows a librarian to provide information literacy sessions to your students over multiple class sessions. Time allotted can be determined by need and faculty wishes. These sessions focus on smaller bites of information, allowing students to be exposed to complex information over time.

Multiple sessions allow librarians to teach information literacy concepts above what is available in the one-shot method. Extra topics include how to read a scholarly article, how to synthesize articles for better comprehension, and the importance of peer-review in the real world.

Embedded Librarian

This method of instruction involves embedding a librarian in your online or hybrid class space. It is most effective when there is a specific assignment involved and students are encouraged to work with the librarian. For more information and to request this service, see our Embedded Library Services page.

Instruction Calenders by Campus

Information Literacy Rubrics

This Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education (Framework) grows out of a belief that information literacy as an educational reform movement will realize its potential only through a richer, more complex set of core ideas.

Ideas for Research Assignments

Annotated Bibliographies
Sample Assignment: 
Prepare an annotated bibliography about your chosen topic. Find a specified number of sources.
e.g. five sources (books, scholarly articles, and/or Websites.) Write brief evaluative annotations. Each annotation must include:

  • a statement on how the source contributed to understanding of the topic.
  • an accurate, complete, and consistent use of a citation style , such as APA or MLA.

Learning objectives and Information literacy outcomes for this assignment:

  • Develops skills in critical thinking, analysis, reading and writing.
  • Develops a sense of how information is dispersed in the particular subject area.
  • Develops a sense of how research is conducted and choices researchers make for their projects.
  • Develops skills in locating and evaluating information about the subject.
  • Develops skills in citation styles and in using information ethically.
     

Comparative Analysis

Sample Assignment: Compare three sources of information about an event or topic.
Locate an article on a specific event or topic from three different sources -
Newspapers or Magazines; scholarly or research articles from a journal;
Website information (National/International sites).
Compare and contrast the information provided for the event/topic and present your findings as an essay or presentation.
The criteria for comparing sources should include checking for:

  • Accuracy of information presented;
  • Authority of the author/producer of information;
  • Objectivity of the information presented;
  • Currency or date information was presented or created;

Learning objectives and Information literacy outcomes for this assignment:

  • Develops skills in critical thinking, analysis, reading and writing
  • Develops skills to evaluate information based on content as well as source.
  • Develops awareness of the impact of author's intent, audience and background on information presented.

    Research Logs
    Sample Assignment: This assignment is especially useful when students are required to write a research paper.]

Keep a record of all the steps you took for researching your topic.
Note down your search terms, keywords used; techniques and methods used to find information;
sources consulted and reasons why; successes and failures of your process.
The assignment will not be graded more for searching success, but for the process used including analytical and detailed log entries.

Learning objectives and Information literacy outcomes for this assignment:

  • Develops skills in critical thinking, analysis, reading and writing.
  • Develops skills in searching using alternative vocabulary.
  • Develops skills in locating and evaluating information about the subject.
  • Develops a sense of how information is dispersed in the particular subject area.
  • Develops understanding of effective vs. ineffective search strategies.

Develops a sense of how research is conducted and choices researchers make for their projects.

Search Analysis

Sample Assignment: Provide a clear statement of your search topic.
Jot down keywords or subject terms you will use for searching a database (e.g. Academic Search Premier) and a Web search engine (e.g. Google).
Compare, describe and evaluate the results for your searches.

Learning objectives and Information literacy outcomes for this assignment:

  • Demonstrates the differences among search tools in terms of content and search strategy.
  • Develops skills in searching using alternative vocabulary.
  • Develops skills to evaluate information based on source.
  • Develops analytical skills.
  • Develops the ability to make deliberate choices of databases and search tools for locating specific information.

Topical Research Analysis

Sample Assignment: Trace the research on your topic over a time period of specified number of years.
When, where and how did information about your topic begin and develop?
Search for information in specialized subject encyclopedias, reference sources, books and articles to determine how your topic has changed over this time period.

Learning objectives and Information literacy outcomes for this assignment:

  • Develops skills in critical thinking, analysis, reading and writing.
  • Develops skills to evaluate information based on source.
  • Develops awareness of the process of scholarship and communication in a research topic or field.

Request Library Instruction

Use the links above to select the type of library instruction you prefer: in person or embedded. Each form provides space for you to tell us about your class and what you would like your students to learn.

Please complete the form as thoroughly as possible and be sure to include your research-based assignment.

LEAP Rubric Research

Instruction Librarians

James Emond

Emily Z. Brown

Lisa Richter

Susan Souza-Mort

Kelly Faulkner

FAQ about Information Literacy Classes

 What is Library Instruction?

  • Provides the Library's users with the skills and knowledge necessary to locate, extract and evaluate the information they need, both now as students, and later as lifelong learners.
  • Provides refresher instruction to faculty members who indicate an interest in updating their skills with the most current technology and information access tools.

Why Library Instruction?

According to library studies, 88% of community college students have not used the library to conduct research of the type faculty require. Library instruction helps students:

  • reduce anxiety
  • master the research process
  • focus and narrow a topic
  • locate a variety of information
  • recognize scholarly vs. popular articles
  • think critically
  • become technologically savvy

I have an appointment off campus during my regular class time; would that be a good date to schedule a Library Instruction Session?

Please plan to attend along with your students. They are motivated when you are there, especially if you participate by adding comments and answering questions about their assignment. Also, you can learn a lot about your students' information-seeking behaviors by seeing them in action. And finally, since new resources are constantly added to the Library's collections, you just might learn something by coming along!  Classes will not be scheduled if the instructor cannot be present.

What is an Embedded Librarian?

Embedded librarians are librarians who work closely with faculty in their courses, providing a library resource to students throughout the course of the entire semester via Blackboard.  Librarians work with instructors to collaborate and create viable library assignments that utilize library resources and answer student questions regarding library materials. This program looks to create an integrated and sustained collaboration with teaching faculty instead of a parallel interaction through traditional library instruction.

I am teaching upper level/honors course, students should have research skills. Should I schedule a Library Instruction class?

It is often presumed that honors students have a familiarity with library systems and  services beyond that of the mainstream undergraduate students (Bush and Wells 1990), but a review of the literature indicates that honors students “are equally as likely as mainstream students to experience ‘library anxiety’ and to be ill-informed about information gathering techniques and strategies” (Snavely and Wright 2003, 299). A number of studies support this statement, indicating that honors students do not, in fact, possess a greater grasp on the research process than other undergraduates (Bush and Wells 1990; Wiggins 1994; Wilson and Mulcahy 1987; Woodard 1996).